#FlanFridays: Persimmon Fruit

(fresh out of the mold)

This is coming a bit late today because I’m still fighting a cold and flu. It’s causing me to move quite slow, an usual pace for me. Truthfully, I had a mishap with this flan. I’m not even going to lie!

It all started as a very exciting and ambitious task this morning. I’ve gotten every one in my family wondering every Friday morning what my flavor will be. I normally choose the morning of, usually finding inspiration from my weeks’ work or places I’ve traveled to. But this morning, my mom spoke and made a timely suggestion.

Mami is passionate about everything she does, including food. When she finds something she likes, she sticks to it and tries to put everyone of us on it, too. Case in point: Persimmons. She started eating this juicy fruit about 8 years ago and has become a mad woman. She buys them in bulk and lest anyone ask, she will devour them within 3 days–that would be a box of 8 or 9.

So, me, not being a huge fan of the orang-y fruit, gave her a sigh and gave in. I’d try it for the sake of doing a new flavor and to put a smile on her face.

It helps that the weather is quickly dropping and all things warm and fuzzy have a place in the house.

I went to work.

{Enter the mishap. This fruit retains a lot of natural water. It’s not very intense in fiber like pineapple or even mango. What does that mean? As the flan cooks, the water from the fruit releases into the custard, causing it to be to highly liquified and canceling out the egg and milk ratio. Well, almost canceling it out. The amount of water in the custard countered against the now diminished amount of eggs (which will ultimately bind the dessert) prohibits the custard from fully cooking. So, lesson quickly learned. Strain such a fruit when making flan.}

Persimmon is a “true” berry and takes a few days to ripen, usually through direct sunlight. If eaten before ripened, a certain variety of persimmon can be astringent as it bears high levels of soluble tannis. Hence, the high levels of tannis are diminished as the fruit ripens.

I kept this in mind when selection my two to use.  Sure didn’t want to create “after dinner” problems! *wink*

I started with mashing two ripened persimmons. Tasted it and found it a bit bland, so I added a dash of nutmeg. That did the job. It actually gave it an unexpected kick of heat.

I made my caramel which alone was seductive enough to lick. Take a look at this beauty!

I finished it up, let the pressure cooker hiss and then chilled it for a few hours.

My only regret is not having made two of these lovelies. This one was playing double duty: today’s feature and dinner at my brother’s house. I couldn’t break into it. So sorry, mis amigos.

But, I do report that it was ultra delicious! But are we surprised? We could taste the small and slightly visible bits of the fruit. It was smooth and truly an aromatic experience. I still can’t say that I’m a fan of the fruit as a stand alone, but together with the sweet and silky caramel, it’s a hit!

I’ll be making this one again tomorrow. Maybe I’ll cut that one up and come up and show a picture of a creamy slice!


Enjoy other #FlanFridays!

Upside Down Pineapple

Pumpkin Spice

“Eat & Tweet” A Flantastic Evening in D.C.

Banana Caramel

Cuban Espresso


Salted Caramel


Eat well, love unapologetically, pray with true intention, and take care of yourself.

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follow Bren Herrera on Pinterest

0 thoughts on “#FlanFridays: Persimmon Fruit

  1. Never heard of that fruit. Up close like that it looks like a tomato which really is a fruit as they say anyway. LOL! And per usual the pics looks amazing girl! You are so creative w’ your flan making. :)

  2. bueno .eso si esta tremendo nunca se me hubiera ocurrido hacer flan de persimo .es una fruta deliciosa y muy jugoza y ese flan esta de comer ahora mismo .gracias por compartir con todos tus lectores algo tan original y sabroso gracias chef bren

  3. One day I’m going to try to create one of these flans. Looks like I need to buy a pressure cooker first though.

  4. What a color! That flan is marvelous. You really should create a flan shop. Something totally new on the market and which could become trendy any day…


    Rosa xoxo

  5. Bren, What a fabulous and thoughtful idea. My pleasure to leave a comment. Enjoy following you on twitter and checking out your recipes. Best, Lynn

  6. Love the look and color of this flan! And the water retention of persimmon has affected sine desserts I’ve made also. Learned the hard way. Great blog.

  7. Oh my goodness!! I simply adore the way that your brain works. This looks wicked good! By the way thanks you so very much for the lovely compliments the other day. I luv you to chica! {{HUGS}}

  8. Miesha: yeah, it’s like a tomato but the taste is different. it’s rather quite bland. i added some spices to it to bring out the flavor. pouring some liquor overtop would be nice, too. next time!

    Carmen: gracias. siempre es un placer compartir recetas con mis lectores.

    Phillip: yes, please do and tell me how it works. you can always make one the traditional method, with a bain marie (water in a pan the mold sits in).

    Rosa: girl, you’ll be the first one to know when I get it up. I’ve been toying with the idea of a flan truck! How fun, right.

    Lynn: Thanks so much! I want it to grow and get people excited about it. It’s really a great idea and easy way to help those in need! Thanks for the message.

    Debbie: Thanks! I love flan, obviously and it was fun playing with the persimmon.

    Tickled Red: Thanks, lovely gal! What I said is true. And the flan was great, really. I was supposed to make another one today, but spent the day out. This week for sure b/c I want to share a picture of it sliced up… the itty bitty pieces of persimmon are worth it! 😉 Hugs to ya!

  9. sounds good, wondering when I will have time to try making it. Have a Blessed holiday Bren and get well. Ginger tea works well for colds and stomach issues.

  10. I slowly grew to appreciate Fuyu persimmons while in California. They’re good in oatmeal, but I haven’t tried cooking with them otherwise. Maybe a tart…

    I’ve yet to have Hachiya or other persimmons, as far as I know. The American persimmon grows locally, but I don’t know if it’s a culinary persimmon.

  11. Love persimmons. There’s one on the counter that has been ripening for a week. It’s perfectly bright orange. Though it’s no flan, it’ll have to do.

  12. Chef Jules: i hope you do! i’d be ticked and please let me know if so! have an absolutely fabulous holiday and Christmas!

    Silvia: te la mando por email.

    Jason: I’ll find out for you and let you know… I’ve only eaten this variety but have seen black ones… have you?

    DuoDishes: interesting. i’m so not crazy about them as a eat alone fruit, but they def. make a good treat in desserts.

  13. Sounds yummy….very creative!!! Looking forward to trying it sometime when we are together…

  14. I am sorry your not feeling well…hope it passes quickly!
    I love persimmons and love this flan :) Excellent notes on the fruits properties especially regarding a custard base…Thank you :)

  15. Merari: ooh wee, tia, it’s sooo good. you need to make it. and abuela would really like it. actually, maybe i’ll make it for her during Christmas.

    Magic of Spice: finally starting to feel better. it was a tough 10 days… ugh. you and my mom both—love persimmons. i’m still not totally convinced… but again, really good in a custard mix or other baked goods.

    Kevin: it was!

    Taste of Beirut: ha! I try to get inventive with the flavors every Friday. Hope you’ll tune in for #FlanFridays

    Jason: Yes, dear! Check this out: http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/black_sapote.html

  16. Juliana: yes girlie and it was honestly really good!! I didn’t think I was going to be crazy about it, but my mother and I devoured it within an hour once we had it for dinner at my brother’s house. no lie… I’m making another one tomorrow so I can photograph a slice…

    C. Allred: Thank you!

    Liza Cardona: Interesting, but good, I promise! :)

    Daniel Klein: Interesting perspective on persimmon. I’m still not crazy about it as a solo fruit…

    Corbin: Thanks–was my mom’s ideas as she’s totally obsessed with them! :)

    Dave Patterson: It was baby. You should have mom make you one! Unless of course you just come to Atlanta soon.

    Eliana: me either! but the flan works.

    Ryan: Thanks. See some notes above. I’m making it again so I can share a pic of the slice…

  17. AJ: Thanks hun…

    CD: awwww, you are too sweet, girl.

    Sharon: Yes they do, cuz it’s freezing here, too!

    Kristin: Ha. How cool is that… I wouldn’t say go out and buy some now, but it def. worked in my custard!

    Mark: Thank you, Mark. So nice to meet you and have you come by. Hope you’ll be back! :)

  18. Your flans are so yummy! And, I love that you’re donating a food item to your local food bank for each comment left on this post.

    Happy holidays!

  19. Gorgeous! There are several varieties of this fruit..and they are SO good for you! Yards in Central Cali are abundant with them and pomegranets..so I go door to door collecting these gems! I am a chef by trade and make salads, risottos and baked goods riddled with the flavors of the season! Your flan looks beautiful! Oh the mighty persimmon!

  20. I never heard of the fruit so I had to look it up on Wikipedia to find out more about it. I’d be curious to taste the fruit and the flan to see how they both are. :)

  21. Will you PLEASE email me at 4as@san.rr.com with the detailed recipe for this fantastic looking Persimmon Fruit Flan?
    I would like to attempt it, but not being as experienced as you are, I need instructions from the beginning to the end!
    I will very much appreciate it.

    Thank you,

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